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Drives e and f have memory

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help' started by mthkumudo, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. mthkumudo

    mthkumudo Established Techie7 Member

    I haven’t the faintest idea what is going on with my computer. A few days ago I made a music disc of 17 tracks. The disc was in a cda format. I tried to play the disc and was unaware that Microsoft apparently does not play that format. Yesterday I put a disc in Drive e to listen to music while on the computer. What came up was the 17 cda tracks. Sort of blew my mind on what was happening. I then put the disc in Drive f and the same occurrence happened. Is there some kind of memory the Drives e and f have that I am unaware of? Has anyone encountered this phenomenon?
    mthkumudo
     
  2. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    Since drive letters tell us nothing about the drives, I cannot answer.

    Drives, by definition are memory devices so don't know what you mean by some kind of memory.

    Windows does support cda - note that cda tells where the tracks are saved. cda files are not sound files.

    What is CDA?
     
  3. mthkumudo

    mthkumudo Established Techie7 Member

    Digerati, I apologize. I thought the Drives e and f were letters assigned to the area where CDs are installed.
    mthkumudo
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    They could be on your machine. But depending on how many hard and solid state drives you have installed, and any partitions on those drives you might have, the drive letters could be installed to them.

    And those letters can shift on you too if you regularly insert and remove USB drives. This is why when I build a new computer for me, I change the drive letters to my opticals to Q and V.
     
  5. Ztruker

    Ztruker Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    Post a screen capture of a full screen Disk Management window. That would tell what drive is what.

    As for the memory, I'll bet that's Windows Media Player's doing.