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Cooling - Case Fan

Discussion in 'General Hardware Issues' started by penguinpaul, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    Hi,

    I've recently been monitoring the temperature on one of the machines in the office/study thing. Fujitsu Siemens, only a P4 HT, its a 3.06ghz, running Xp. The cpu temps have been about 65 idle, and it doesnt seem to measure the temp past 70 when its under load.

    The case temp was about 49, and the hds were about the same, so I've gone and got an akasa 80mm fan for the case. The mobo wont power a case fan, so I'm using the 4 to 3 pin molex adaptor. The case temp is now around 30 - 35 ish, much better. But I'm not sure which way the fan should be blowing. Its blowing outwards at the moment, which I *think* my machine does.. Is this the best way for the air?? Its the machine with 3 blue LEDs on the front, which are also small vents.
    I used compressed air and the hoover on the very dusty heatsink for the CPU and i think thats helped loads.. But anyway, if anyone could help with me with the airflow of the CPU fan it would be much appreciated :)

    thanks,
    Paul :turned:
     
  2. dobhar

    dobhar Technical Guest

    1 person likes this.
  3. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    hey thanks man :stuart:

    thats good, i'll try and get some front fans as well :rolleyes_

    -Paul
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    Yeah, you generally want unrestricted front to back air flow. Also bigger fans move more air at lower RPM - this is good because lower RPMs equal less noise. So if your case supports 92mm or 120mm fans, that's better.

    Also, if you have flat ribbon cables for any hard or floppy drives, you could replace them with round cables. These restrict air much less, come in various lengths, and different colors, which is nice when tracing cables in a crowded box.
     
  5. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    yeh, i had a 90 but i had to buy an 80, the case only supported an 80..
    because the mobo has no case fan output, im powering off a molex, so its running flat out (2500 rpm). Is this ok, or should I try and get some kind of voltage regulator??? I was just wondering if its very efficient at 2500RPM or not..

    Thanks,
    Paul
     
  6. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    That is perfectly fine - that's how all fans used to be powered. And since it is running full speed, it is cooling better. The ONLY reason to use speed controls on fans is to control noise - if you got good ball-bearing fans, noise should not be bad.
     
  7. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    brushless so yeh... its alright sound wise.. its not me who uses it anyway :D
    my mum and my sister, and theyre not fussy :rolleyes_

    time to order an arctic cooling alpine 7 GT for it :D
     
  8. Digitalis

    Digitalis Guest

    I have a desktop now, but I had a lappie once & there were overheating problems, I solved it by getting a twin fan cooling unit that a laptop stands on, cheap too, at £14.99!
     
  9. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    Do they actually work then??? Cos my old lappy gets very very hot and then it BSODs.. might be worth getting one :rolleyes_

    also, I couldnt get an Alpine 7 for the fujitsu, turns out its a 478 not a 775 :rolleyes_

    got a thermaltake one coming tho :clap:
     
  10. Digitalis

    Digitalis Guest

    They certainly do, although I live in England where it rarely gets above 65c, where I had the lap, in the summer, It'd top 80c quite often,
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 20, 2009
  11. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    I recommend notebook cooling pads with external power supplies, like this. Otherwise, the fans are powered by the notebook's USB port. If the notebook is already hot, putting more demands on the motherboard's internal power circuits only adds to the heat problem.
     
  12. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    yeh, that would be a good option for mine, since the battert only lasts 30 mins anyway :rolleyes_
     
  13. jephree

    jephree ¨*·.¸ «.·°·..·°·.» ¸.·*¨

  14. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    thanks jephree :sorcerer:
    this has to be the best forum ever for mods doing stuff, and keeping it all nice and tidy :angel:

    anyway, back to the topic.

    I ordered a ThermalTake fan and heatsink for the fujitsu machine on thursday.. Came on Saturday, only prob was they send the wrong one :rolleyes_ sent one for an Athlon xp 3400+ instead of the skt 478 :rolleyes_ now i have to wait till tomorow for them to be in the office and give me an RMA :boat:

    heh, internet these days :D
     
  15. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    Make sure you apply a proper layer of TIM.
     
  16. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    dont think i'll have to, cos all previous ones I've bought have had TIM preapplied to the heatsink.. But yeh, will do :turned: cant say i think much of the spreader which came with my akasa tim hehe..
    And has anyone else noticed how Akasa's TIM clean smells like Terry's chocolate orange?? :rolleyes_
     
  17. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    Well, understand the pads are mostly paraffin and are virtually ineffective until the CPU heats up, melts the pad, excess paraffin is extruded from between the mating surfaces from pressure of the clamps. Now generally, that works fine as long as (1) it is a new, unmelted pad, in good condition and (2) the mating surface is totally clean. That said, I don't like the idea of excess paraffin squirming around, so I always replace the pads.
     
  18. penguinpaul

    penguinpaul Dedicated Member

    oh ok, this is only an old P4 processor, but for future, if if ever get an upgrade on my heatsink on my machine, i'll bear that in mind, thanks :D
     
  19. Digerati

    Digerati Super Moderator Techie7 Moderator

    The age and type of processor is not important. A good application of TIM is required for nearly every device that sits under a heatsink.